Success Story: Recovery from Autism (and then some)

I spent two days crying, for once happy tears. I keep a blog and the topics are on many things but this one is about my daughter whom I was told to institutionalize.

Don't give up hope, keep up the good fight. I hope someone can gain from knowing that sometimes the fight is worth it.

justcallmeladyluck.blogspot.com/.../fight-when-you-know-youre-right.html
Parents
  • DC, I actually already subscribed to your blog ;) Thanks for posting it though.

    Now to address the "recovery" angle. We all know once they are diagnosed that there are lifelong issues. She has those but when you're dealing with school services (FAPE in LRE) they can only do so much.

    In third grade, when she threw her desk at the classroom of students, they finally started listening to me. Considering she was a kid on an IEP they couldn't expel her. So they stuck her into a kindergarten class temporarily until the emergency IEP could take place. The move her dad forced upon us was the worst thing that could have ever happened to her. Just thinking of her sitting in fetal position in the corner of the "Juvie" class can bring fresh tears as I type. Ultimately, by fifth grade she was labeled as "ED" (emotionally disturbed), and as devastating as that label felt, it was the best thing to get her into the "ED class" - this classroom had one teacher, one psychologist, and three to four aides with no more than a dozen children; usually 8 or 10, mostly boys. This is when she began to blossom and this is the class that ultimately helped her succeed with strict rules, appropriate and immediate discipline for inappropriate behaviors and constant, throughout the day, checkins. This class, this teacher, this placement is what saved her.

    Now, at almost 14, she is fairly immature. She has a difficult time following conversations, is fairly hyperactive, has major sleep issues and still plays with toys (which we promise to keep inside the walls of our home). The only comparison I have is her twin brother (who is HFA) but he stopped playing with toys a few years ago (around 10) and has matured drastically; his autism manifests more as OCD and anxiety and he's never been in a special ed class.

    My littlest one, I'll save for another blog. His "recovery" is even more profound and he now works as a professional model (successfully) which is part of the reason I am cautious about sharing his story. He had the most severe diagnosis and most miraculous recovery.

    Thanks for commenting. It feels nice to be heard.
Reply
  • DC, I actually already subscribed to your blog ;) Thanks for posting it though.

    Now to address the "recovery" angle. We all know once they are diagnosed that there are lifelong issues. She has those but when you're dealing with school services (FAPE in LRE) they can only do so much.

    In third grade, when she threw her desk at the classroom of students, they finally started listening to me. Considering she was a kid on an IEP they couldn't expel her. So they stuck her into a kindergarten class temporarily until the emergency IEP could take place. The move her dad forced upon us was the worst thing that could have ever happened to her. Just thinking of her sitting in fetal position in the corner of the "Juvie" class can bring fresh tears as I type. Ultimately, by fifth grade she was labeled as "ED" (emotionally disturbed), and as devastating as that label felt, it was the best thing to get her into the "ED class" - this classroom had one teacher, one psychologist, and three to four aides with no more than a dozen children; usually 8 or 10, mostly boys. This is when she began to blossom and this is the class that ultimately helped her succeed with strict rules, appropriate and immediate discipline for inappropriate behaviors and constant, throughout the day, checkins. This class, this teacher, this placement is what saved her.

    Now, at almost 14, she is fairly immature. She has a difficult time following conversations, is fairly hyperactive, has major sleep issues and still plays with toys (which we promise to keep inside the walls of our home). The only comparison I have is her twin brother (who is HFA) but he stopped playing with toys a few years ago (around 10) and has matured drastically; his autism manifests more as OCD and anxiety and he's never been in a special ed class.

    My littlest one, I'll save for another blog. His "recovery" is even more profound and he now works as a professional model (successfully) which is part of the reason I am cautious about sharing his story. He had the most severe diagnosis and most miraculous recovery.

    Thanks for commenting. It feels nice to be heard.
Children
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