Success Story: Recovery from Autism (and then some)

I spent two days crying, for once happy tears. I keep a blog and the topics are on many things but this one is about my daughter whom I was told to institutionalize.

Don't give up hope, keep up the good fight. I hope someone can gain from knowing that sometimes the fight is worth it.

justcallmeladyluck.blogspot.com/.../fight-when-you-know-youre-right.html
Parents
  • I have three children whom no longer "suffer" from autism. This is a matter of semantics maybe? They all have autism, always will. I spent thousands of hours (and $$) for early intervention. They have "recovered" from the painful symptoms and socially crippling effects of it.

    I apologize for using the wrong word, i.e. recovery. And this prompts a good question? What do I say about my kids then? Survived? Endured? Lived-through? Succeeded over? Conquered?

    When my twins were 8 and my littlest was 4, no one could have convinced me I'd be sitting in the vantage point I am today. My son had a shadowing aide until the 3rd grade who had to brush his skin and do compressions just so he could cope with his dad; that child didn't speak til almost five - all the years prior he spent screaming, crying and pointing (and biting). Now he's an A student, mainstreamed and has made the allstar basketball team three years in a row. No need to retell his twin sister's story (it was the reason for this post). My youngest? He developed at an advanced rate until about 19 months - then stopped and regressed. I could not leave the house with this one - he stabbed his brother four times by the time he was four, started a fire in my home and smeared his own *** until he was six. Refused to wear clothing, then one day, after 40 hours a week of early intervention for three years the SCHOOL DISTRICT labeled him "recovered from autism".
    That child is now a top booking model - why? Cause he can make very good eye contact with a camera and has learned to manage his behavior. He still struggles to make eye contact with other people and has some stimming behaviors (we call it "movie talking").

    My kids no longer "suffer" from autism. I apologize for a poor choice of words in my blog title.
Reply
  • I have three children whom no longer "suffer" from autism. This is a matter of semantics maybe? They all have autism, always will. I spent thousands of hours (and $$) for early intervention. They have "recovered" from the painful symptoms and socially crippling effects of it.

    I apologize for using the wrong word, i.e. recovery. And this prompts a good question? What do I say about my kids then? Survived? Endured? Lived-through? Succeeded over? Conquered?

    When my twins were 8 and my littlest was 4, no one could have convinced me I'd be sitting in the vantage point I am today. My son had a shadowing aide until the 3rd grade who had to brush his skin and do compressions just so he could cope with his dad; that child didn't speak til almost five - all the years prior he spent screaming, crying and pointing (and biting). Now he's an A student, mainstreamed and has made the allstar basketball team three years in a row. No need to retell his twin sister's story (it was the reason for this post). My youngest? He developed at an advanced rate until about 19 months - then stopped and regressed. I could not leave the house with this one - he stabbed his brother four times by the time he was four, started a fire in my home and smeared his own *** until he was six. Refused to wear clothing, then one day, after 40 hours a week of early intervention for three years the SCHOOL DISTRICT labeled him "recovered from autism".
    That child is now a top booking model - why? Cause he can make very good eye contact with a camera and has learned to manage his behavior. He still struggles to make eye contact with other people and has some stimming behaviors (we call it "movie talking").

    My kids no longer "suffer" from autism. I apologize for a poor choice of words in my blog title.
Children
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