AS without sensory overload?

Hello,

My son is 3 years old and currently diagnosed with PDD-NOS however I believe that the diagnosis will be changed to Asperger's in the future when's he a bit older. He fits the DSM-IV criteria especially now that he's more verbal. His language is not delayed at all. However my son does NOT have any sensory issues at this time. I know that sensory issues are not required for a diagnosis but it seems that the majority of people with Asperger's Syndrome have some level of sensory disorder as well. So am I wrong in thinking that he will most likely be diagnosed with Asperger's even though there's no sensory issues present? Is it possible for someone with Asperger's to not have sensory overload?

Also, he doesn't have severe meltdowns like other children diagnosed with Asperger's. My son has what I think of as mini-meltdowns where something upsets him and he suddenly freaks out for a couple minutes and then gets over it very quickly. Very short and what I would think is something that any child would go through.

I know that I can just ask his doctor about this stuff but I'm just interested/curious to see what non-doctor people have to say. I get kind of sick of listening to doctors all the time and would rather just listen to other people that actually live with ASD on a daily basis. So I'm just looking for some insight. Or someone that can relate. Is there anyone here that has Asperger's without sensory overload?

Thanks in advance for any replies.
  • Hi, as a child my aspie daughter didn't appear to have any trouble with sensory issues. These days she doesn't like too much noise, yet when she listens to music she's happy to have it really loud. She also didn't have meltdowns. It's only been as an adult when there seems to be no answers that she has had any kind of meltdown. I think there's alot more to aspergers than those 2 issues which seem to be endlessly talked about sometimes.
  • I think,the sensory issues,could get worse over time.One reason being,I have been reading about copper overload and low zinc.Low zinc can cause sensitive hearing,and your copper load can increase overtime.Not saying he has copper overload,just that it can get worse,if it is an issue.I don`t remeber having sensitive hearing when i was younger,but seem to have it more now.Things may show up more after school starts.The noise,the flourescent lights and crowded class rooms,may bring about some sensory overload.I think,nutritional deficiencies can make it worse.
  • My daughter talks well,and didn`t seem to have to much trouble with meltdowns,until she started school,and started having some learning issues,which seem to be related to her extreme sensitivity to lights.Flourescent lights and computer monitors.Frustration from not being able to do the work,can cause meltdowns.
  • My daughter is 15 and can now notice things that contribute to her sensory overloads... and yes, computor lights, flourecent lights are one of the few, the other things is crowds, alot of different noises at once,(like kids hearding through the halls at bell time) anxiety, confusion, (my daughter's brain goes to mush when she gets confused and overwhelmed and then she has to find a place that is completely mute until she can put her little brain back together. Its really about things that trigger it, my child would be golden and wouldn't be considered anything other than average if she could live in a world without confusion, anxiety, stress, crowds, noise, but could live a life of complete and total calm schedules and everything was seen her way. LOL
  • My son doesn`t seem to be as sensitive as my daughter.He used to be,but I think,his diet and chelation therapy has helped with this.He is way lower functioning than she is.
  • I like yr line here
    Its really about things that trigger it, my child would be golden and wouldn't be considered anything other than average if she could live in a world without confusion, anxiety, stress, crowds, noise, but could live a life of complete and total calm schedules and everything was seen her way. LOL

    I like it because it does show how intolerant the human world is to accommodating all the people (not just ASD ones ) who need a far amount of quiet, order, correct lighting etc. Why should it be all so hard? Wouldn't most people like a bit more of these things? Do they not notice that their mind turns to mush with too much of the wrong type of stimulation?

    It is a strange world we live in.

    Nora
  • Does my head in that children are being medicated to fit into an unacceptable, incompatible environment, when its actually the environment that should be changing ....I just shifted every thing to go at my sons speed and capability, confirmed his stress and fear as reasonable but pointed out every one else had to cope and he could learn to as well...and kept him as safe and well as I could until he learnt how to function within it....he didn't seem to have sensory overload, but he was born with one hell of a chip on his shoulder about being here.... on the other hand he was full of energy and wanted to live to 200 at least...I agree, more to it than just symptoms, my sensory issues were massive but I had an incompatible diet and spent mychildhood in toxic shock.
  • This brings up some interesting questions. What would it take to make the human world more sensory friendly? What would people have to give up? What would they gain? What would the economic price be? Who would suffer in a senorially friendly environment?
  • I have been diving into homeopathic minerals.Just zinc,so far,but I plan on getting all of them.I think,Ia big issue,is deficiencies,and many of us have absorbtion issues.Advanced water methods of homeopathy is best,in my opinion.I gave my kids a dose of homeopathic zinc,and almost,right away,it seemed to help,but it works over time,so,i`ll wait a week and then try homeopathic calcium.
  • @newnoz
    That would never happen. I think people would rather create systems for us to fit in with them than change so we'll be comfortable.
  • I have to agree with the concensus here. Sensory issues are emergent with neural development. My son's sensory overload issues were also very mild at the age of 3. By the age of 5 it's a different story. Pay attention to the triggers because they aren't the same for everyone. His 'mini' melt-downs may seem out of the blue, but I bet you there's a pattern there.
  • Hi. My 8 year old autistic son has many sensory triggers and gets extremely agitated. His latest is if someone touches him.he scratches the area like crazy and starts to have a melt down. This is hard when I have a 2 year running around. He also hates wearing pants. He says it bothers him. I have tried every material out there. I even iron on some his favorite pictures. This is a big problem when its cold outside. We live in Florida so weather changes. Anyone have these issues and how do they manage?
  • I did all the regressions and looking back on it , I don't agree that it's regression so much as not progressing. With each step we are supposed to take the pressure, stress and disconnection from our natural state occurs, and we have nothing to replace it with except what every one else can do and of course we are going into toxic shock from incompatible foods etc....If Autistic children were permitted to stay in their natural state or brain function, were fed according to their capacity to recognize food and were taught according to their strengths rather than their weaknesses I think it would work out differently for a huge percentage of them....winging it ...I think you should test your boys ph balance to see if his body has escalated into an acidic or inflammatory state.
  • Hi Wingingit

    What happens with the two year old when all this happens? I'm not sure i understand.?
    two year olds are a lot of work. So are 8 year old ASD kids.

    My suggestion is that no one touch him. Check out the of the clothing stores online for ASD kids. He is probably not going to suffer hypothermia in Florida. Pick your battles. Ask him what he thinks you should do. Eight is old enough to problem solve some things. It will make him feel more cooperative if you allow him to give opinions and ideas before a decision is reached.

    My experience is with myself, my kids and my stepsons. Its not the last word but then i am not sure who has the last word other than the child himself and you for another ten years if youre lucky.

    Nora
  • Hi Wingingit

    What happens with the two year old when all this happens? I'm not sure i understand.?
    two year olds are a lot of work. So are 8 year old ASD kids.

    My suggestion is that no one touch him. Check out the of the clothing stores online for ASD kids. He is probably not going to suffer hypothermia in Florida. Pick your battles. Ask him what he thinks you should do. Eight is old enough to problem solve some things. It will make him feel more cooperative if you allow him to give opinions and ideas before a decision is reached.

    My experience is with myself, my kids and my stepsons. Its not the last word but then i am not sure who has the last word other than the child himself and you for another ten years if you're lucky.

    Nora