Hans Asperger can the term Asperger continue after what has been discovered?

Can the term Asperger continue now we have discovered that Hans Asperger send disabled children to a clinic in Vienna to be killed.?

 

I went to a lecture and the lecturer was not sure that Hans Asperger was a Nazi.

 

I do not think Hans Asperger was a Nazi but he did evil things to stay safe and to further his own career.

He really should have tried to escape to the USA instead of continuing to do his work in Nazi occupied Austria.

Hans Asperger died in 1980 so he cannot now be prosecuted but whether we should continue using the term Asperger is doubtful.

Asperger was not used for a long time after the war as Nazi Germany and Austria were discredited.

David Shamash London

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • I am of the inclination to let those using this name to identify themselves decide... My daughter for instance has bo desire to change. She is an “Aspie” and “always will be”.
  • It doesn't matter at this point. The term Asperger is used not to identify with the person, but with the work he did to identify a syndrome he observed. It has been in use for a long time. Changing the term now because of what he did personally is only being vindictive and only adding to the confusion caused by the changes to the DSM-5. The term Asperger or "Aspie" has in-depth meaning that is obscured or lost in the more or less generic description from the DSM-5. I am 79 and only recently, 4 years ago, learned I am an Aspie. In reading everything written about it, I now have a sense of identity. What is more important, things written by other Aspies gives me a sense of comradery with them and I am proud of it. I can identify with people like Temple Grandin. I am very much like her.
  • It doesn't matter at this point. The term Asperger is used not to identify with the person, but with the work he did to identify a syndrome he observed. It has been in use for a long time. Changing the term now because of what he did personally is only being vindictive and only adding to the confusion caused by the changes to the DSM-5. The term Asperger or "Aspie" has in-depth meaning that is obscured or lost in the more or less generic description from the DSM-5. I am 79 and only recently, 4 years ago, learned I am an Aspie. In reading everything written about it, I now have a sense of identity. What is more important, things written by other Aspies gives me a sense of comradery with them and I am proud of it. I can identify with people like Temple Grandin, who is more full autistic, but near to Asperger's in the spectrum. I am very much like her. Her work has enlightened me greatly.